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More Eephus Fun: Joey Votto Destroys One, Japanese Pitcher Shows Us How It’s Done

Funny and Happy, Interesting

We love a lot of things here at Baseball is Fun, but one of our favorites is a good ole fashioned eephus pitch.

In case you forgot what an eephus pitch was, here’s a little reminder of what a successful and unsuccessful one looks like:

Basically, it’s the attempt by a pitcher to sneak a slow, looping pitch right down the middle of the plate (and past an unsuspecting hitter).

The thinking, I imagine, is that the batter will be so caught off guard, he won’t quite know what to do with it. Shrug. Sometimes it works.


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… And sometimes it doesn’t.

Remember MLB’s resident bad-boy, Joey Votto?

Yeah, well, he cares not for your silly eephus attempts, Yu Darvish:

That pitch is absolutely crushed – in every single sense of the phrase – right out of the ball park, and Darvish knows it right away:

(Pictured above: The face of a man who knows what just happened.)


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But to be fair, that pitch felt like half-an-eephus. In other words, it didn’t really feel like Darvish entirely committed to the strategy that’s supposed to make that pitch work in the first place.

If you’re interested in what full-out commitment to an eephus looks like, we’ve got you covered (h/t to @EamusCatuli0000 on Twitter for the assist):


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You know the center-field camera man was caught off guard when he had to pan the camera up three feet to capture the pitch, because THAT’S an eephus pitch.


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Michael Cerami

Michael Cerami writes about MLB at Baseball Is Fun. You can find him on Twitter @Michael_Cerami.

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