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Giancarlo Stanton Blasts Two Homers for a Combined 900 Feet, Reaches Multiple Records

Homers

Over the past few weeks, a certain East Coast right fielder has been taking the league by storm with his monster home runs and huge exit velocities. His name is Aaron Judge.

Already this season, Judge has broken the Statcast Exit Velocity home run record, paced the leauge with hits over 115 MPH, and had multiple multi-homer games.

However, he is not the only freakishly strong right fielder to crush baseballs into dust. In fact, the original Aaron Judge, Giancarlo Stanton, is still haunting the dreams of pitchers on a nightly basis.

Take a look at his performance from last night, when he hit two homers for a combined 900 feet against the Mets:

According to Statcast, Stanton is just the third player in the Statcast era to hit two homers in a single game for a combined minimum of 900 feet.


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The first homer was a three-run shot, which left the bat at 113.1 MPH before traveling 436 feet. The second one, however, was the bigger blast. That dinger left the batt at 113.4 MPH, traveled 468 feet and was the longest home run at Citi Field in the Statcast era.

In addition to the crazy distance those balls had, they were also hit notably hard. Stanton’s ninth and tenth home runs were the second and third hardest hit homers at Citi Field since last July … when Stanton hit the first hardest hit homer at Citi Field. Naturally.

Now, just he and Judge are the only two MLB players to hit two homers of at least 113 mph in the same game (again, during the Statcast era). On the season, Stanton is slashing .256/.328/.556 with 10 home runs and a 128 wRC+.


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Judge may be the new kid on the block, but Stanton is still the king.

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Michael Cerami

Michael Cerami writes about MLB at Baseball Is Fun. You can find him on Twitter @Michael_Cerami.

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